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Janiczek community members recently enjoyed an evening of sushi rolling at Izakaya Den in Denver. Chef and Owner Yasu Kizaki taught twenty clients and employees about the history, types, and methods of rolling sushi.

“Everyone enjoyed meeting each other and we learned some fascinating things from a master of his craft,” said Brady Siegrist, partner. “It was a rather unique cultural experience.”

Janiczek community event with Brady Siegrist and Yasu Kizaki

Brady Siegrist presents his sushi creation to Chef Yasu Kizaki

Janiczek Events

This year, the Janiczek team resolved to nurture personal and professional connections between community members.

“Many of our clients reside in the greater Denver area,” said Siegrist. “Our team plans to present future opportunities for clients to get to know one another. One of our goals is to explore topics and activities that seek to enhance life and living in some way.”

Janiczek Community

Whether discussing investments, longevity, or sushi, the benefits of connecting Janiczek community members can be powerful. Future events are in the planning stages, so if you are interested in learning more about the growing Janiczek community, let us know!

Books, Reading and Knowledge

“I read and read and read. I probably read 5 to 6 hours per day. I read five daily newspapers, I read a fair number of magazines, I read 10k’s, I read annual reports, and I read a lot of other things too. I’ve always enjoyed reading. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest.”
– Warren Buffett

In other words, reading opens one’s mind to bigger and better things. Another voracious reader, Bill Gates, recently shared his picks for some good summer reading. And who wouldn’t be interested in reading what a brilliant thinker like Gates found illuminating?

Of course, the Janiczek community isn’t short on good book recommendations either. In December, our team offered up some of our favorite books of the year, and our client community responded with some great picks of their own. (One client recommendation made the current Bill Gates list … great minds think alike, right?!)

So, as you begin your summer reading, whether to learn or to simply escape, we gladly share a few of our picks. Personally, I’ll be reading one of Bill Gates’ picks, Origin Story: A Big History of Everything by David Christian.

If you have book recommendations, by all means, let me know!

Book Recommendations from the Janiczek Team

You might need to evaluate your comfort zone to see if it is holding you back!

As a practicing financial advisors who conduct hundreds of financial review meetings a year, we can say with authority that financial stagnation in some form hinders most people.

Financial stagnation is a state of impaired action – when you are stuck in an inactive state due to some fear, conflict, or mental block. A classic example is avoiding participating in the stock market for fear of losing money while simultaneously feeling stressed about dismal bond or money market returns. Another classic example is delaying to create or update your estate plan, even though you are exposed to more taxation than necessary or have family members who would suffer the consequences of an unoptimized or incomplete plan.  Financial stagnation may be isolated to one financial domain, such as investments or estate planning, or may be present across many financial domains.

I have witnessed how exciting it can be when people plagued by inaction for 10 years or more make more progress in one year than they did in the previous decade by confronting the root cause(s) of their stagnation. You will feel tremendous relief and personal satisfaction by identifying and confronting the causes of any financial stagnation you are experiencing.

Lifelong learning.  It’s a core belief here at our firm, and we regularly read across a variety of topics.  I recently asked the team to share any of their favorite books from the past year, business or otherwise.  Below is what we’d offer up as our recommendations from 2017, and if you have any good book recommendations from the last year, please let us know!

Brady Siegrist

As my clients know, planning for the future eventually includes a conversation about mortality.

What Are Your Own Possibilities?

You can't take it with youSometimes, the pursuit of wealth can leave a void in our lives—a place left empty because we lacked the energy or time to pursue a dream. There is a saying: “Wealth is not an end, it is a means to an end.” The problem is that the complexity of creating wealth and the subsequent financial planning often gets in the way of seeing and pursuing an end truly aligned with your highest purpose in life.

My life’s work has been focused on this critical unmet need. I hope to help people see the possibilities that open up once you escape from the chaos and confusion that characterize so much of the wealth management field today. I absolutely know it is possible to put a large portion of wealth management on automatic; I have built the system, structure, support and discipline to achieve this; and I’ve seen how using these benefits helps people define and achieve their highest ambitions. This approach is both effective and rewarding.

Clients are surprised sometimes when I ask them about their higher purpose and possibilities. It is not that they feel I’m prying; they just don’t expect an advisor to be concerned with such matters. I tell them that these are the most important questions for them to consider when it comes to financial planning.

At this point in your journey toward financial strength, you already may have great momentum. All you need to reach the goal line is to exercise self-control in a few vital areas. I call these personal finance disciplines the High Five because they are the key to achieving your highest potential in life. They are:

  • Saving Awareness and Control
  • Spending Awareness and Control
  • Work Ethic
  • Goal-Setting
  • Learning

 

By automating or delegating a huge share of the discipline needed to master wealth, you can reserve your energy for situations when it is needed most. This is one of the secrets of the successful people with whom I have the privilege to work. They devote their best to challenges associated with their greatest ambitions, rather than squandering valuable energy on secondary pursuits.

Ready for the next market correction? Today’s drop rekindles questions of whether this bull market is finally over. To be sure, stocks are up over 7% in the first 4 months, extending the 8-year run from the 2009 low.

But the bull market run has resulted in some expensive prices. Regardless of whether one uses multiples relative to sales, book value, trailing earnings, or normalized earnings, stocks aren’t cheap. The Shiller P/E ratio, which compares stock prices to normalized earnings over a 10-year cycle, is at its third highest dating back to 1887. The top two instances were 1929 (before the Great Depression) and 1997 (during the Tech Bubble).

warren blogBerkshire Hathaway’s Warren Buffett released his annual letter to shareholders last Saturday, a publication that is examined and dissected by investors around the world. And this year’s edition underscores why.

Before its release, the S&P 500 closed at its all-time high (again), continuing its rally that began in November. In fact, in the first 38 trading days of 2016, the S&P 500 has posted a new high 11 times. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and Russell 2000 Index have printed new highs 14 and 3 times in 2016, respectively.

Even the greenest of investors is likely aware that stocks move in both directions, and that periods of upswings have historically been followed by downturns. The Holy Grail, of course, is how to invest through all the ups and downs, and Buffett offers his view:

Legacy PlanningLegacy planning goes beyond mere numbers, aligning traditional estate planning with a family’s goals and values. The process includes defining and expressing what wealth means to a family. It involves identifying the core values that bind the family, and in many cases it involves grooming children and grandchildren to be guardians of not just wealth, but also those values.

Financial advisors can provide peace of mind. But do they deliver a demonstrable, dollars-and-cents advantage to their clients?

a-leaders-disciplineTwo studies show that the answer is yes—if the advisor is diligent in providing several key services. Let’s start with research from Morningstar, the big Chicago-based investment research firm. A 2012 Morningstar study found that advisors who use an “efficient financial planning strategy” can help clients increase their retirement assets significantly.

By making better decisions in five areas, the study found, advisors can help their clients earn an extra 1.82% a year—or about 30% more for their retirement.


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