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Tax season is in full swing, and it can bring some uneasy thoughts.  “How much will I get back?”  “How much will I owe?”  “Am I forgetting anything?”  “What can I expect next year?”

In a recent team meeting, one of our firm’s partners shared a question from a client that’s often not heard, “Why is my tax bill so low?!”

This client had been taking significant IRA distributions since the beginning of retirement as they had settled into a routine of travel and other retirement leisure.  Of course, IRA distributions are generally going to be taxed as income, and the client became accustomed to paying a steady tax bill each year.  In recent years, their travel slowed and their expenses correspondingly decreased, but their regular withdrawals had not.

Investors in the U.S. are keenly aware of how managing taxes can help to build wealth—as evidenced by the trillions of dollars that we’ve invested in IRAs, 401(k)’s and other tax-sheltered accounts.

What too many of us fail to consider, however, is the need to remain tax-conscious even after we’ve built our wealth. For retirees seeking to preserve and appreciate their wealth, tax-savvy decisions are especially important.

One of retirees’ key tools for tax management is known as retirement withdrawal sequencing. In plain English, this refers to the order in which you make withdrawals from various account types to fund your retirement.

Those who have saved successfully often have a combination of taxable, tax-deferred and tax-free accounts. When that’s the case, proper planning about which accounts to tap first can allow you to defer a substantial amount in taxes while maximizing the opportunity for the remaining accounts to appreciate.

RBS Blog 06.03.16The other day I read a Bloomberg article that cited a recent survey suggesting that while the average U.S. employee calculates that he or she will retire at age 65, as a group the odds are around 50% that they will still be working at age 70. By the tone of the story, I would surmise this is less by choice and more by need.

At Janiczek Wealth Management, we are very fortunate to work with financially independent individuals and families, who have successfully put themselves in position to control their own destiny as it relates to their financial well-being. In the majority of cases, this independence did not simply happen overnight, but was the result of hard work and perseverance that eventually resulted in a major liquidity event or accumulation of wealth that changed the equation from “having to work”… to “choosing to work”. It is a very powerful edge to know that you are going to work simply because you want to, not because you have to.

The Department of Labor (DOL) will be coming out with a major decision next week that will effect virtually all financial professionals and clients, as they provide guidance that addresses the most
important decisions of our financial lives; what to do with clients 401(k) once they retire.   Retirement investors are harmed – primarily in the form of higher costs and lower retirement savings –
DOLwhen they receive conflicted advice that puts the adviser’s interest ahead their own.

By requiring fiduciary accountability for all advice related to retirement assets, the rule will provide much needed protections to help retirement investors navigate the complex and confusing financial services marketplace.
For many Americans, whether to rollover and how to invest their retirement nest egg, is one of the most important financial decisions they will make as there is more than $14.4 trillion of retirement assets in 401(k) plans and Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs).  Under the current regulatory framework, all advisers are not required to make rollover IRA recommendations in their clients’ best interest, leaving Americans subject to conflicted advice related to their retirement savings.

Selling Your Business

I recently presented to a room full of successful business owners on the topic of “ensuring your business is part of your retirement strategy”. What became immediately clear was the level of success these individuals have recognized as they continue building their respective companies… and ultimately their net worth. The stories shared had many similar financial characteristics including: record sales growth, impressive earnings, strong revenues, great cash flow, ability to reinvest back into their companies, as well as healthy distributions back to the owner that allowed for living an enviable lifestyle.

Stepping away from the discussion of their shared business successes, I inquired on how many owners had a concise vision of when they planned to step away from their business and what their ideal retirement (or post-business life) looked like. Roughly 50% of the room raised their hand with the majority planning to exit within 3 to 10 years. They shared visions of extensive travel, second homes, giving back to their communities, spending quality time with family, new hobbies, starting a new business, etc. The overriding goal was to be financially independent of course!


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